Some thoughts on Sahagun and the Florentine Codex

Working in a field like the Atlantic World means I have access to all sorts of sources! A couple of days ago, I was looking at the role of the Dutch Golden Age in mediating cultural transmission through a number of their more popular cartographers. Today, I’ve backtracked about a century from the middle seventeenth-century … Continue reading Some thoughts on Sahagun and the Florentine Codex

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Panel: Sexual Violence and Neoliberalism, Historical Materialism, June 2013

Panel in Question: https://youtu.be/1NdYu4P_PJM Conference Website: http://hmny.org/past-conferences/hmny2013/ I’m supposed to be writing about multi-racial identity and my own personal narrative from that framework. So, of course, I’m procrastinating by listening to a panel on the role of neoliberalism in re-codifying sexual violence against women. The context for this panel was the 2013 conference on Historical Materialism hosted … Continue reading Panel: Sexual Violence and Neoliberalism, Historical Materialism, June 2013

Slavery and Social Death + Provincializing Europe

Patterson’s Slavery and Social Death (1982) remains one of the most thorough analyses of slavery as an institution and its impact on the individual. Terms like social death and natal alienation remain vocabulary that scholarship since has utilized and contested. Its structure, however, is essentially capitalist. His definition of slavery utilizes three components: violent domination, … Continue reading Slavery and Social Death + Provincializing Europe

Class and Classism: My Contribution to UChicago’s Dis-O Guide, 2013

A brief entry I wrote for the Dis-Orientation Guide at UChicago. The full PDF is available here: Dis-Orientation Guide, University of Chicago, Fall 2013 One of the trickiest aspects of class is its ambiguity. Poll, after poll over the past decade has demonstrated a majority of Americans associates with the term “middle class”[1]. These sorts … Continue reading Class and Classism: My Contribution to UChicago’s Dis-O Guide, 2013

Peter Novick’s That Noble Dream

I have mentioned my more-than passing interest in historiography previously on this blog, but I thought I would spend time today talking about it more in-depth. My interest in the history of history comes from wanting to understand the intellectual roots of how we derive historical knowledge—the past is past, to borrow a cliché. How … Continue reading Peter Novick’s That Noble Dream